The domain within your query sequence starts at position 41 and ends at position 350; the E-value for the TraB domain shown below is 6.2e-67.

FLWTIRRHPPAYLFGTIHVPYTRVWDFIPDNSKAAFQASTHVYFELDLTDPYTISALASC
QLLPHGENLQDVLPRELYWRLKRHLDYVKLMIPSWMTPAQRGKGLYADYLFNAIAGNWER
KRPVWVMLMVNSLTETDVRSRGVPVLDLYLAQQAEKMKKSTGAVERVEEQCHPLNGLNFS
QVLFALNQTLLQHESVRAGSLQAPYTTEDLIKHYNCGDLNAVIFNHDTSQLPNFINTTLP
PHEQVTAQEIDSYFRQELIYKRNERMGKRVMALLQENQDKICFFAFGAGHFLGNNTVIDV
LRQAGLEVDH

TraB

TraB
PFAM accession number:PF01963
Interpro abstract (IPR002816):

In prokaryotes, for example Enterococcus faecalis (Streptococcus faecalis), the conjugative transfer of certain plasmids is controlled by peptide pheromones [(PUBMED:15374642)]. Plasmid free recipient cells secret plasmid specific oligopeptides, termed sex pheromones. They induce bacterial clumping and specifically activate the conjugative transfer of the corresponding plasmid. Once recipient cells acquire the plasmid they start to produce a pheromone inhibitor to block the activity of the pheromone and to prevent plasmid containing cells from clumping; they also become donor cells able to transfer the plasmid to plasmid free recipient cells. Examples of such plasmid-pheromone systems are bacteriocin plasmid pPD1 [(PUBMED:7559344)], haemolysin/bacteriocin plasmid, pAD1 [(PUBMED:1924555)], tetracycline-resistance plasmid, pCF10 [(PUBMED:8349565)], and the haemolysin/bacteriocin plasmid, pOB1 [(PUBMED:7772836)].

TraB in combination with another factor contributes to pheromone shutdown in cells that have acquired a plasmid. It exact function has not yet been determined [(PUBMED:2158976), (PUBMED:10850999)]. This entry also contains plant and mammalian proteins, suggesting that these Trab-related proteins may have a somewhat wider or different function in eukaryotes.

This is a PFAM domain. For full annotation and more information, please see the PFAM entry TraB